Posts Tagged ‘ vaccination ’

An Educated Approach to Vaccination by Christina Chambreau, DVM

August 24, 2012

Dr. Christina Chambreau and Friend


Overview

While annual physical examinations by your veterinarian are critically important for the health of your animal, there is growing concern about giving annual vaccines. In my opinion, the best approach to vaccination is to build up the health of animals so they are not susceptible to acute infectious diseases (therefore do not need vaccines). Some dogs and cats will become severely ill even with the very first vaccines, so before vaccinating, be sure they are as healthy as possible. Vaccines for viral diseases such as dog or cat distemper (panleukopenia) and Parvo provide lifetime immunity if they provide any at all. The other vaccines either provide little immunity, short lived immunity, or do not even cover the local disease. Even Rabies vaccine protects for life but I do recommend following your legal requirements unless you are working with an integrative veterinarian who is recommending less frequently. 

When giving vaccines, realize there can be serious side effects. Do no give multiple ones at a time. Take steps to prevent reactions and carefully continue to evaluate health after the vaccine(using the Early Warning Signs) . If health does suffer, treat holistically as soon as problems are noticed. 

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Yorkie Encephalitis: Muffin’s Vaccine Reaction

August 11, 2012

Muffin

Muffin was a healthy, happy little 1 1/2  year old pup who was full of life and enthusiasm, always off  on some adventure, and ready to play whenever anyone would give her the time of day.   She was very loving and affectionate, but quite the little explorer, and very independent.   She was known then, in her puppy training classes, as Miss Muffin.  Very bright, loving and full of the devil, she was always getting into mischief.

 
When my mom passed away 2 1/2 years ago, we needed to go back east for the funeral.  Although I wanted to take the girls with me, my family felt it would be better if they did not come, so I looked around for the most trust worthy sitter I could find to care for my two precious babies while I was gone.  Who better than my local Vet?  She boarded pets, I knew, and I trusted her completely, as she had been my vet for many years previously when my baby Merlin was still with me.  He too was a very tiny yorkie, so I felt completely safe leaving them.  They told me Muffin needed a rabies shot and they would take care of it while I was gone.  “No biggie,” I thought. Foolish Me!!! 

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Rabies Vaccine Skin Reaction: Ischemic Dermatopathy

August 3, 2012
See the results rabies-induced Ischemic Dermatopathy on Peaches' haunch and ears

Rabies-vaccine-induced Ischemic Dermatopathy forced the retirement of Peaches from competition. See the disease on her haunch and ears.

Peaches, Judy Schor’s champion agility dog, retired from competition, and almost died, when she developed Ischemic Dermatopathy after rabies vaccination. Judy raised $30,000 with her benefit for the Rabies Challenge Fund, a nonprofit trying to prove that the vaccine gives immunity for at least seven years. Principal Fund researcher Dr. Ron Schultz , and co-Founder Dr. Jean Dodds, spoke about the dangers of the rabies vaccine at the benefit. A second benefit was held in San Diego in 2010.  A video from both events is available at Safer Pet Vaccination. All proceeds benefit the Rabies Challenge Fund.

Here is how vaccination changed Peaches’s life as told by Judy: As a well intentioned and responsible pet owner, I take my pups in for their annual Well checks and Dental’s. And like clockwork, every 3 years, as required by law, my dogs would get their 3 year Rabies vaccine. In early April of 2007, I took my beloved Rat-Terrier Peaches in for her 7 year Rabies booster. We returned home and nothing unusual noted, however in retrospect, maybe I was remiss in noticing any lethargy or changes as I really never thought that a legally required vaccine could/would cause any harm.
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Vaccinate or Test Titers? by Margo Roman, DVM

August 2, 2012

Dr. Margo Roman and her dogs

The antibody titer is used to determine your pet’s need for a booster immunization and whether a recent vaccine caused a strong enough response from your pet’s immune system to protect them against the specific disease.

Since 1996 we have been doing antibody titers instead of the traditional vaccine protocol of yearly boosters for Distemper and Parvo, and Panleukopenia for the cats. Read more »

Does My Cat Really Need Another Vaccine? by Shawn Messionier, DVM

July 29, 2012

Dr. Shawn Messonier

When you get the annual reminder from your veterinarian this year telling you that it’s time for your cat’s booster vaccinations, ask yourself the following question: does my cat really need another set of vaccinations? While it’s important to have ongoing preventive health care for your cat, annual vaccinations may not necessarily be part of their preventive care. In this article I’ll share with you a more natural option to the standard recommendation of annual vaccines. 

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Antibody Titer Tests: A Video Featuring Ron Schultz, PhD

July 28, 2012

Dr. Ronald D. Schultz’s Saving Lives with Antibody Titer Tests webcast, recorded in September, 2011, is RACE approved for professional continuing education (CE) for vets, vet techs and Certified Animal Welfare Administrators.  We urge anyone wanting serious, up-to-date information on using blood antibodies titer testing to prevent unnecessary vaccination to watch this excellent video produced by Maddie’s Institute and featuring from one of the world’s top experts. (See below for more information.) 

Read Saving Lives with Antibody Titer Tests – Live Webcast  Audience Questions and Answers  

Thanks to Dr. Schultz and Maddie’s Fund for granting us permission to post this.

Click here to learn more about titer testing.

Maddie’s InstituteSM is pleased to be able to offer CE credit to veterinary professionals. In order to qualify for CE credit we ask that individuals attend and participate in the entire program and score 70% or greater on a post-test.  Note: The RACE CE expires two years from the live event (which was September, 2011). 

This program was reviewed and approved by the AAVSB RACE program for 1 hour of continuing education in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval. Please contact the AAVSB RACE program if you have any comments/concerns regarding this program’s validity or relevancy to the veterinary profession.

This course has been pre-approved for Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credits.  http://www.maddiesfund.org/Resource_Library/Saving_Lives_with_Antibody_Titer_Tests.html

About Maddies Fund:

The Maddie’s Fund® mission is to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals.

Maddie’s Fund, the Pet Rescue Foundation, is a family foundation established in 1999 to help fund the creation of a no-kill nation. Since its inception, Maddie’s Fund has awarded animal welfare organizations and universities $96.2 million to save dog and cat lives.

Bordetella: Does Your Dog Need the Kennel Cough Vaccine?

July 21, 2012

Your veterinarian, kennel owner, trainer, day care provider or groomer says your dog should/must be vaccinated against kennel cough, but you’re trying not to over-vaccinate.

What should you do?

More and more, people are finding another vet, kennel owner, day care provider or groomer — or keeping their pet at home!  Vaccination is a serious medical procedure with significant risks. 

If that weren’t bad enough, the “kennel cough” vaccine is unlikely to prevent kennel cough! It can even produce kennel-cough like symptoms. The WSAVA Guidelines say, “Transient (3–10 days) coughing, sneezing, or nasal discharge may occur in a small percentage of vaccinates.” It can also cause a serious anaphylactoid reaction. Look up anaphylactoid. You won’t like it.

Regarding facilities requiring this vaccine: In general, if they have good ventilation and practice good hygiene, kennel cough shouldn’t even be an issue. Bordetella is not for dogs playing together in well-ventilated areas — like dog parks or backyards or living rooms. It’s for dogs in close quarters, like kennels. That’s why it’s called kennel cough! Read more »

7 Things You Don’t Know About Vaccinating Pets

July 19, 2012

1. The only vaccine required by U.S. law is rabies. 15 states currently offer exemptions to animals with serious health problems and more are adding exemptions. Not all states require cats and ferrets to be vaccinated. Note: because laws change with little fanfare, not all veterinarians know the current regulations. Click here to see a list of U.S. state laws. Double check with your city and county Animal Control.

2. There is little or no research showing that annual revaccination for core vaccines boosts immunity. Studies do show that core vaccines shouldn’t be given any more frequently than every three years — not every three years.

3. Mature dogs and cats rarely die from vaccine-preventable infectious disease and thus may not need vaccinating.

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Vaccine Reactions: Underreported and Unrecognized, Not Unimportant

July 16, 2012

Dr. James R. Shannon, former Director of the US National Institute of Health, has been widely quoted as saying: “The only safe vaccine is one that is never used.” 

But are adverse vaccine reactions really a big deal? Aren’t they just the “fever and fatigue” we’re warned about after yearly shots? Or is there more to learn?

And aren’t moderate and severe adverse reactions rare? Let’s answer this question first.

Reactions are considered rare, in part, because reporting is rare. Unlike reporting for human vaccine reactions, required by the National Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, reporting is voluntary for reactions experienced by animals. Furthermore, there is no federal Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) for animals as there is for humans, nor is there a National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). That does not mean that adverse events aren’t a serious a problem for animals. In fact, because animals are given numerous vaccines repeatedly (and unnecessarily) throughout their lives, rather than just in childhood, the problem is likely worse.

WSAVA Vaccination Group Guidelines (p. 18) recognizes that there is “gross under-reporting of vaccine-associated adverse events which impedes knowledge of the ongoing safety of these products.”  AAHA (p. 19) says, “Although AE [adverse event] documentation in veterinary medicine is limited, severe adverse reactions are considered uncommon.” But if reporting is rare, how do they know?

Perhaps the biggest problem in underreporting is the failure to match an illness or problem to a vaccine. Read more »

Clinical Approaches to Managing and Treating Adverse Vaccine Reactions by W. Jean Dodds, DVM

June 29, 2012

by W. Jean Dodds, DVM

Background There is no doubt that application of modern vaccine technology has permitted us to protect companion animals effectively against serious infectious diseases.

Viral disease and recent vaccination with single or combination modified live-virus (MLV) vaccines, especially those containing distemper virus, adenovirus 1 or 2, and parvovirus are increasingly recognized contributors, albeit relatively rare,  to immune-mediated blood disease, bone marrow failure, and organ dysfunction. Potent adjuvanted killed vaccines like those for rabies virus also can trigger immediate and delayed (vaccinosis) adverse vaccine reactions. Genetic predisposition to these disorders in humans has been linked to the leucocyte antigen D-related gene locus of the major histocompatibility complex, and is likely to have parallel associations in domestic animals.

It must be recognized, however, that we have the luxury of asking such questions today only because the risk of disease has been effectively reduced by the widespread use of vaccination programs.

Adverse Events Associated with Vaccination The clinical signs associated with vaccine reactions typically include fever, stiffness, sore joints and abdominal tenderness, susceptibility to infections, neurological disorders and encephalitis, collapse with autoagglutinated red blood cells and icterus (autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA, also called immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, IMHA), or generalized petechiae and ecchymotic  hemorrhages (immune-mediated thrombocytopenia , ITP).  Hepatic enzymes may be markedly elevated, and liver or kidney failure may occur by itself or accompany bone marrow suppression.

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We have cancer in our pets because… by Margo Roman, DVM

June 24, 2012

The article below is a topic that I think should be on the minds of every individual as we ponder why so many animal are getting cancer and they are getting sicker and sicker. As a veterinarian for over 35 years I am seeing more chronically ill animals that cannot be cured as their immune systems have failed. We are seeing this in younger and younger animals as cancer affects over 46% of dogs and 39 % of cats. The frustration that veterinarians and their caretakers feel is overwhelming. Owners ask Why? and Why can’t we help them? We are getting epigenetic damage from many of the 80,000 chemicals that are in our environment that were not there 60 years ago.

Those of us who work in holistic veterinary medicine are trying to find ways to keep these tragic failures of the health of these individual animals. As we look at the research that is in the below and now we can see that all the pesticides, toxins and unnecessary vaccinations that we have given our pets for generation after generation have done damage that has changed the genes of those pets. What our dogs grandmother got exposed to can affect multiple generations to come. Sicker and sicker, younger and younger until it is so obvious.

We all need to start to wake up and start to question all the chemicals we put on our lawns, clean our homes, spray or spot on our pets. You are what you eat and those chemical will transfer their damage to your DNA too. The animals we bring into our homes are the canaries in the coal mine. They are showing us what the future of our human family members will be. In 12 years we can see 6 generations of pets and genetic breakdown can be right in front of our face…Lets wake up and try to stop further damage and help our beloved family members more protected from toxic chemicals and environmental damage.

I say these words as a frustrated veterinarian questioning the massive numbers of cancer that come into my practice. We try to boost the immune system and try to support the healthy cells and organs so they can resist the DNA damage. We hope to make more quality life and more quality time with these very important family members. 

From Margo Roman, DVM  http://mashvet.com/blog

Sources:

http://www.naturalnews.com/035965_epigenetics_inheritance_synthetic_chemicals.html
You can hear the audio of a discussion on this paper

 

 

All About Vaccine Issues & Vaccination by Dodds & Schultz

June 23, 2012

W. Jean Dodds, DVM and Ronald D. Schultz, PhD

There is little doubt that application of modern vaccine technology has permitted us to protect companion animals effectively against serious infectious diseases. Today, we can question conventional vaccine regimens and adopt effective and safe alternatives primarily because the risk of disease has been significantly reduced by the widespread use of vaccination programs, which convey underlying population or herd immunity.

For many veterinary practitioners canine vaccination programs have been “practice management tools” rather than medical procedures. Thus, it is not surprising that attempts to change the vaccines and vaccination programs based on scientific information have created significant controversy. A “more is better” philosophy still prevails with regard to pet vaccines.

Annual vaccination has been and remains the single most important reason why most pet owners bring their pets for an annual or more often “wellness visit.” Another reason for the reluctance to change current vaccination programs is many practitioners really don’t understand the principles of vaccinal immunity. Clearly, the accumulated evidence indicates that vaccination protocols should no longer be considered as a “one size fits all” program.

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2010 Feline Vaccination Protocols by W. Jean Dodds, DVM

June 12, 2012

MINIMAL VACCINE USE

Note: The following vaccine protocol is offered for those cats where minimal vaccinations are advisable or desirable.  The schedule is one I recommend and should not interpreted to mean that other protocols recommended by a veterinarian would be less satisfactory.  It’s a matter of professional judgment and choice.

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2010 Canine Vaccination Protocol by W. Jean Dodds, DVM

June 12, 2012

MINIMAL VACCINE USE

Note: The following vaccine protocol is offered for those cats where minimal vaccinations are advisable or desirable. The schedule is one I recommend and should not interpreted to mean that other protocols recommended by a veterinarian would be less satisfactory. It’s a matter of professional judgment and choice.

Read more »

What Everyone Needs to Know About Canine Vaccines by Ronald D. Schultz, PhD

June 12, 2012

For many veterinary practitioners canine vaccination programs have been “practice management tools” rather than medical procedures. Thus, it is not surprising that attempts to change the vaccines and vaccination programs based on scientific information have created great controversy and unique methods of resistance to the proposed changes have been and are being developed. For some practitioners the issues are not duration of immunity for the vaccines, nor which vaccines are needed for the pet, instead it is felt that every licensed vaccine should be given to every pet on an annual or more often basis. Ironically this is fostered by the fact that multivalent products with 7 or more vaccine components can be purchased for the same price or less than a product with one or two vaccine components. A “more is better” philosophy prevails with regard to pet vaccines. On many occasions practitioners say that “I know many of the vaccines I administer probably aren’t needed but it won’t hurt to give them and who knows the animal may need them some time during their life because of unknown risk.” I have also been told by many practitioners that “I believe the duration of immunity for some vaccines like distemper, parvovirus and hepatitis is many years, but until I find another way to get the client into my office on a regular basis I’m going to keep recommending vaccines annually.  Annual vaccination has been and remains the single most important reason why most pet owners bring their pets for an annual or more often “wellness visit.” The importance of these visits for the health of the pet is exceptional. Therefore, dog owners must understand the vaccines are not the reason why their dog needs an annual wellness visit. Another reason for the reluctance to change current vaccination programs is many practitioners really don’t understand the principles of vaccinal immunity.

A significant number of practitioners believe: 1) the annual revaccination recommendation on the vaccine label is evidence the product provides immunity for (only) one year. – Not True

2) that they are legally required to vaccinate annually and if they don’t they will not be covered by AVMA liability insurance if the animal develops a vaccine preventable disease – Not True. Furthermore, certain companies will not provide assistance if practitioners don’t vaccinate annually with core vaccines. Not True – In fact most of the companies have now demonstrated their core products provide at least 3 years of immunity.

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Vaccinating Cats and Small Dogs: A Special Danger

June 10, 2012

A Purdue University vet school study (by Moore et al), published in 2005 in the AVMA Journal and widely-cited elsewhere (see AAHA Guidelines p. 22), tracked vaccine reactions occurring within 72 hours of vaccination for 1.2 million dogs vaccinated at 360 veterinary hospitals. It showed that small breed dogs receiving multiple vaccines per office visit were at greatest risk of a vaccine reaction. The report recommends: These factors should be considered in risk assessment and risk communication with clients regarding vaccination.

“The VAAE [reaction] rate decreased significantly as body weight increased. Risk was 27% to 38% greater for neutered versus sexually intact dogs and 35% to 64% greater for dogs approximately 1 to 3 years old versus 2 to 9 months old. The risk of a VAAE significantly increased as the number of vaccine doses administered per office visit increased; each additional vaccine significantly increased risk of an adverse event by 27% in dogs ≤ 10 kg (22 lb) and 12% in dogs > 10 kg.”  Read more »

AVMA Approves Rabies Vaccination Medical Exemptions

June 10, 2012
The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), which represents more than 82,000 vets across the U.S., has revised its policy on rabies vaccination to include the following:

“… AVMA recognizes some animals might require a waiver from rabies vaccination because the vaccination poses an unacceptably high risk to the health of the individual animal, or a waiver might be necessary for research purposes. If adequate steps can be taken to minimize the chance of exposure to rabies virus, the AVMA recommends that such animals be granted a waiver from mandatory rabies vaccination, upon recommendation of a licensed veterinarian and with the concurrence of the appropriate public health authorities.”

35 state laws/regulations currently do not allow medical exemptions.

Read the Waiver language here: http://www.avma.org/issues/policy/annual-rabies-vaccination-waiver.asp

The AVMA has also provided an Annual Rabies Vaccination Waiver Form.

16 STATES currently have MEDICAL EXEMPTIONS: AL, CA, CO, CT, FL, IL, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NV, NY, OR, VT, VA and WI.  It is possible your state may have an undiscovered exemption that is not part of the main law. Such was the case in Illinois. And CA regulations changed county to county. If your area has anexemption unlisted here, please contact the Rabies Challenge Fund. They are working to provide more medical exemptions for unhealthy animals.

Additional articles of interest:

Rabies Vaccination Medical Exemptions for Unhealthy Dogs

Vaccinating Unhealthy Pets: Beware Reactions & Vaccine Failure

Rabies Vaccination: 13 Ways to Vaccinate More Safely

What to Do When Your Dog Has a Vaccine Reaction 

7 Quick Things Most People Don’t Know About Vaccinating Pets

June 10, 2012

1. The only vaccine required by U.S. law is rabies.  16 states, and some localities, currently offer medical exemptions for animals with serious health problems and more exemptions are likely coming since the AVMA now approves. Not all states require cats and ferrets to be vaccinated, but all states require vaccination of dogs. Click here to see your state rabies laws. Note: laws change with little fanfare and not all veterinarians know current regulations. In addition, although all 3-year vaccine drug makers guarantee 3-year immunity, and despite the increased health risk from unnecessary vaccination, some localities continue to require more frequent “boosters.” Check with your local Animal Control for details. Find a list of states working on exemptions.

2. There is little or no research showing that annual revaccination for core vaccines boosts immunity. Studies show that the important “core” vaccines Read more »

Preventing Vaccine Adverse Effects for Pets and People

May 25, 2012

By Jean Hofve, DVM

For our pets, the rabies vaccine is a legal requirement. There are similar requirements for a variety of vaccines for children entering school. Officials even considered making the swine flu mandatory for U.S. residents, though this threat has not yet manifested.” Here are suggestions on how to prevent the potentially deadly adverse effects of vaccination. Plan ahead, and be prepared! (For a 1-page summary that you can copy and paste to make for easy printing, click here.)

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Subjects of Interest