Posts Tagged ‘ Ronald D. Schultz ’

Antibody Titer Tests: A Video Featuring Ron Schultz, PhD

July 28, 2012

Dr. Ronald D. Schultz’s Saving Lives with Antibody Titer Tests webcast, recorded in September, 2011, is RACE approved for professional continuing education (CE) for vets, vet techs and Certified Animal Welfare Administrators.  We urge anyone wanting serious, up-to-date information on using blood antibodies titer testing to prevent unnecessary vaccination to watch this excellent video produced by Maddie’s Institute and featuring from one of the world’s top experts. (See below for more information.) 

Read Saving Lives with Antibody Titer Tests – Live Webcast  Audience Questions and Answers  

Thanks to Dr. Schultz and Maddie’s Fund for granting us permission to post this.

Click here to learn more about titer testing.

Maddie’s InstituteSM is pleased to be able to offer CE credit to veterinary professionals. In order to qualify for CE credit we ask that individuals attend and participate in the entire program and score 70% or greater on a post-test.  Note: The RACE CE expires two years from the live event (which was September, 2011). 

This program was reviewed and approved by the AAVSB RACE program for 1 hour of continuing education in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval. Please contact the AAVSB RACE program if you have any comments/concerns regarding this program’s validity or relevancy to the veterinary profession.

This course has been pre-approved for Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credits.  http://www.maddiesfund.org/Resource_Library/Saving_Lives_with_Antibody_Titer_Tests.html

About Maddies Fund:

The Maddie’s Fund® mission is to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals.

Maddie’s Fund, the Pet Rescue Foundation, is a family foundation established in 1999 to help fund the creation of a no-kill nation. Since its inception, Maddie’s Fund has awarded animal welfare organizations and universities $96.2 million to save dog and cat lives.

All About Vaccine Issues & Vaccination by Dodds & Schultz

June 23, 2012

W. Jean Dodds, DVM and Ronald D. Schultz, PhD

There is little doubt that application of modern vaccine technology has permitted us to protect companion animals effectively against serious infectious diseases. Today, we can question conventional vaccine regimens and adopt effective and safe alternatives primarily because the risk of disease has been significantly reduced by the widespread use of vaccination programs, which convey underlying population or herd immunity.

For many veterinary practitioners canine vaccination programs have been “practice management tools” rather than medical procedures. Thus, it is not surprising that attempts to change the vaccines and vaccination programs based on scientific information have created significant controversy. A “more is better” philosophy still prevails with regard to pet vaccines.

Annual vaccination has been and remains the single most important reason why most pet owners bring their pets for an annual or more often “wellness visit.” Another reason for the reluctance to change current vaccination programs is many practitioners really don’t understand the principles of vaccinal immunity. Clearly, the accumulated evidence indicates that vaccination protocols should no longer be considered as a “one size fits all” program.

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Duration of immunity for canine and feline vaccines: A review by Ronald D. Schultz, Ph.D.

May 25, 2012

Abstract

In our studies aimed at assessing the minimum duration of vaccinal immunity (DOI), approximately 1000 dogs have been vaccinated with products from all the major US veterinary biological companies. The DOI for the various products is determined by antibody titers for all dogs and, by challenge studies in selected groups of dogs. Recently, all major companies that make canine vaccines for the U.S. market have completed their own studies; published data show a 3 years or longer minimum DOI for the canine core products, canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and canine adenovirus-2 (CAV-2).

Studies with feline core vaccines – feline parvovirus (FPV), calicivirus (FCV) and herpes virus type I (FHV-1) have shown a minimum DOI of greater than 3 years. Based on these results, the current canine and feline guidelines (which  recommend that the last dose of core vaccines be given to puppies and kittens 12 weeks of age or older, then revaccination again at 1 year, then not more often than every 3 years) should provide a level of protection equal to that achieved by annual revaccination.

In contrast, the non-core canine and feline vaccines, perhaps with the exception of feline leukaemia vaccines, provide immunity for 1 year. In general the effectiveness of the non-core products is less than the core products. Thus, when required, non-core vaccines should be administered yearly, or even more frequently.

# 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V # 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V.
R.D. Schultz / Veterinary Microbiology 117 (2006):75–79. The complete article is available at www.sciencedirect.com

Subjects of Interest