Posts Tagged ‘ feline ’

Feline Injection-Site Sarcoma: The Battles of Kitty Kat

August 2, 2012

Kitty Kat

Time from diagnosis to death….four months. Cost of treatment……$6,800.

 
Angel Kitty Kat Gonzalez was a beautiful and sweet long haired Tortoiseshell cat. I had never owned a cat before Kitty Kat showed up on my doorstep in the fall of 2003. When I took my pets (I have a dachshund too) to the veterinarian for wellness or illness visits I never questioned their care or treatment. I was naive in believing that my veterinarian was up to date on the latest and best medical care. I believed they loved my fur babies as much as I did.

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Duration of immunity for canine and feline vaccines: A review by Ronald D. Schultz, Ph.D.

May 25, 2012

Abstract

In our studies aimed at assessing the minimum duration of vaccinal immunity (DOI), approximately 1000 dogs have been vaccinated with products from all the major US veterinary biological companies. The DOI for the various products is determined by antibody titers for all dogs and, by challenge studies in selected groups of dogs. Recently, all major companies that make canine vaccines for the U.S. market have completed their own studies; published data show a 3 years or longer minimum DOI for the canine core products, canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and canine adenovirus-2 (CAV-2).

Studies with feline core vaccines – feline parvovirus (FPV), calicivirus (FCV) and herpes virus type I (FHV-1) have shown a minimum DOI of greater than 3 years. Based on these results, the current canine and feline guidelines (which  recommend that the last dose of core vaccines be given to puppies and kittens 12 weeks of age or older, then revaccination again at 1 year, then not more often than every 3 years) should provide a level of protection equal to that achieved by annual revaccination.

In contrast, the non-core canine and feline vaccines, perhaps with the exception of feline leukaemia vaccines, provide immunity for 1 year. In general the effectiveness of the non-core products is less than the core products. Thus, when required, non-core vaccines should be administered yearly, or even more frequently.

# 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V # 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V.
R.D. Schultz / Veterinary Microbiology 117 (2006):75–79. The complete article is available at www.sciencedirect.com

Don’t Vaccinate Your Adult Cat for Distemper! by Jean Hofve, DVM

May 25, 2012
By Jean Hofve, DVM

Seriously? Yes! Evidence is mounting that the common FVRCP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and paneleukopenia) vaccine may cause long-term damage to cats’ kidneys that increases with every booster. Here’s the report from Colorado State University:

The Center for Companion Animal Studies at Colorado State University has shown that cats vaccinated with FVRCP vaccines grown on Crandell-Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cell lines can develop antibodies to renal proteins, and that cats hypersensitized to CRFK cell lysates can develop interstitial nephritis…Cats administered FVRCP vaccines parenterally (by injection) have higher levels of circulating antibodies to these antigens than do cats who were administered a FVRCP vaccine for intranasal administration.

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Subjects of Interest