Posts Tagged ‘ Ron Schultz ’

Antibody Titer Tests: A Video Featuring Ron Schultz, PhD

July 28, 2012

Dr. Ronald D. Schultz’s Saving Lives with Antibody Titer Tests webcast, recorded in September, 2011, is RACE approved for professional continuing education (CE) for vets, vet techs and Certified Animal Welfare Administrators.  We urge anyone wanting serious, up-to-date information on using blood antibodies titer testing to prevent unnecessary vaccination to watch this excellent video produced by Maddie’s Institute and featuring from one of the world’s top experts. (See below for more information.) 

Read Saving Lives with Antibody Titer Tests – Live Webcast  Audience Questions and Answers  

Thanks to Dr. Schultz and Maddie’s Fund for granting us permission to post this.

Click here to learn more about titer testing.

Maddie’s InstituteSM is pleased to be able to offer CE credit to veterinary professionals. In order to qualify for CE credit we ask that individuals attend and participate in the entire program and score 70% or greater on a post-test.  Note: The RACE CE expires two years from the live event (which was September, 2011). 

This program was reviewed and approved by the AAVSB RACE program for 1 hour of continuing education in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval. Please contact the AAVSB RACE program if you have any comments/concerns regarding this program’s validity or relevancy to the veterinary profession.

This course has been pre-approved for Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credits.  http://www.maddiesfund.org/Resource_Library/Saving_Lives_with_Antibody_Titer_Tests.html

About Maddies Fund:

The Maddie’s Fund® mission is to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals.

Maddie’s Fund, the Pet Rescue Foundation, is a family foundation established in 1999 to help fund the creation of a no-kill nation. Since its inception, Maddie’s Fund has awarded animal welfare organizations and universities $96.2 million to save dog and cat lives.

What Everyone Needs to Know About Canine Vaccines by Ronald D. Schultz, PhD

June 12, 2012

For many veterinary practitioners canine vaccination programs have been “practice management tools” rather than medical procedures. Thus, it is not surprising that attempts to change the vaccines and vaccination programs based on scientific information have created great controversy and unique methods of resistance to the proposed changes have been and are being developed. For some practitioners the issues are not duration of immunity for the vaccines, nor which vaccines are needed for the pet, instead it is felt that every licensed vaccine should be given to every pet on an annual or more often basis. Ironically this is fostered by the fact that multivalent products with 7 or more vaccine components can be purchased for the same price or less than a product with one or two vaccine components. A “more is better” philosophy prevails with regard to pet vaccines. On many occasions practitioners say that “I know many of the vaccines I administer probably aren’t needed but it won’t hurt to give them and who knows the animal may need them some time during their life because of unknown risk.” I have also been told by many practitioners that “I believe the duration of immunity for some vaccines like distemper, parvovirus and hepatitis is many years, but until I find another way to get the client into my office on a regular basis I’m going to keep recommending vaccines annually.  Annual vaccination has been and remains the single most important reason why most pet owners bring their pets for an annual or more often “wellness visit.” The importance of these visits for the health of the pet is exceptional. Therefore, dog owners must understand the vaccines are not the reason why their dog needs an annual wellness visit. Another reason for the reluctance to change current vaccination programs is many practitioners really don’t understand the principles of vaccinal immunity.

A significant number of practitioners believe: 1) the annual revaccination recommendation on the vaccine label is evidence the product provides immunity for (only) one year. – Not True

2) that they are legally required to vaccinate annually and if they don’t they will not be covered by AVMA liability insurance if the animal develops a vaccine preventable disease – Not True. Furthermore, certain companies will not provide assistance if practitioners don’t vaccinate annually with core vaccines. Not True – In fact most of the companies have now demonstrated their core products provide at least 3 years of immunity.

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Duration of Immunity: How Long Does Immunity Last?

June 9, 2012

How long does immunity from a vaccine last? Here are the results of canine duration of immunity (DOI) studies by Ronald Schultz, PhD.* 

The study warns: “The minimum duration of immunity data does not imply that all vaccinated dogs will be immune for the period of time listed, nor does it suggest that immunity may not last longer (e.g. the life of the dog). The percentage of vaccinated animals protected from clinical disease after challenge with canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and canine adenovirus in the present study was greater than 95%.”

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Do we need to vaccinate older cats and dogs?

June 8, 2012

Abstract [Highlighting ours]

Vaccination can provide an immune response that is similar in duration to that following a natural infection. In general, adaptive immunity to viruses develops earliest and is highly effective. Such anti-viral immune responses often result in the development of sterile immunity and the duration of immunity (DOI) is often lifelong. In contrast, adaptive immunity to bacteria, fungi or parasites develops more slowly and the DOI is generally short compared with most systemic viral infections. Sterile immunity to these infectious agents is less commonly engendered. Old dogs and cats rarely die from vaccine-preventable infectious disease, especially when they have been vaccinated and immunized as young adults (i.e. between 16 weeks and 1 year of age). Read more »

Subjects of Interest